Author Archives: Mary Barrett

Finance at Bellevue University

“New Year, New You!”, so the saying goes.  Many people begin the new year with a sense of renewed determination to try new things, retry old things, and generally get their lives back in order.  Of course, now that we are well into February, many of those resolutions have fallen by the wayside or simply stalled in light of, well…’life’ getting in the way.  While this is certainly not unusual, it is also true that typical resolutions can help ‘life’ feel more manageable. Many people are still facing unprecedented economic uncertainty due to the COVID-19 recession.  Those same people were often living paycheck to paycheck even before the economic downturn.  While safely maintaining a steady income is certainly the first order of business these days, planning for the future and cultivating a working knowledge of finance go a long way toward easing one’s mind about future economic uncertainty.  With a little help from the Bellevue University Library print collection, it is easy to build your financial know-how no matter what your current baseline is.  The print collection about Finance includes the following subsections, which you can browse depending on what you would like to focus on.

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American History in the Bellevue University Library

This November saw a presidential election rife with misinformation, political divisions, and endless time in front of cable news channels.  Of course, because it is 2020, this unprecedented national decision played out on a backdrop of increasing COVID-19 concerns and economic hardship. This has led to a rise in anxiety and personal stress across the United States, which can make the upcoming holiday season even more daunting.  In stressful times, it is easy to fall into the trap of believing that everything is out of control.  How will the Zoom-facilitated Thanksgiving get-together possibly work if the future seems so uncertain?  One way to ease those understandable concerns is to focus on things that are controllable.  Of the problems currently facing us, misinformation is the simplest one to fight on one’s own.  With a little help from the Bellevue University Library print collection, it is easy to combat misinformation about the United States history and culture.  The history and culture of the United States is broadly divided in the print collection into the following subject areas.

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“Out of Omaha” DVD E185.96.O98 2019

Systemic racism. It is a term that has become increasingly common over the last few years in the United States, particularly since the tragic murder of African-American George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, in May 2020. That murder and the protests it sparked continue to challenge the status quo of long standing power structures. It also confronted the way many white Americans view their own privilege and definition of racism. Despite the ubiquity of the protests and internet-based discussions, these undeniable problems may seem somewhat distant to white Americans living in the Omaha-metro area of Nebraska. The area surrounding the main Bellevue University campus can feel removed from the issues of racism and discrimination “those other places” face. This, however, cannot be further from the truth, as can be seen in the documentary, “Out of Omaha.”

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Asian History at the Library

Asia is both the largest and most populous continent on earth, with approximately 30% of the land mass and 60% of the population.  When many Americans think of ‘Asia’, images of large Chinese cities, endless Japanese anime, or trendy K-Pop idols come to mind.  While that is certainly correct, Asia contains so much more culture and history than that located in the large East Asian countries. Its coasts are the birthplaces of many of the world’s oldest cultures, including China, India, and the civilizations of Mesopotamia.  Currently, Asia is divided into several smaller regions that exhibit distinct cultural differences.  These regions are generally referred to as East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Eurasia.

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The Lost City of the Monkey God

Many familiar with Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child’sPendergast” fictional adventure novel series may be surprised to learn that Preston is also a career journalist.  He has written about archaeology, history, and paleontology for several prestigious publications including Smithsonian, National Geographic, and the New Yorker.  It was while covering an archaeological expedition for National Geographic that Preston became inspired to write The Lost City of the Monkey God.  Despite the provocative title, this non-fiction account of archaeology, anthropology, and epidemiology is not an “Indiana Jones” style adventure story.  It is a well-researched yet accessible account of modern archaeology in action.

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Won’t You Be My Neighbor? DVD Review

For many children in the 1970s and 1980s, parents encouraged them to watch educational television shows, like those on PBS.  One popular show offered was Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, hosted by Fred Rogers.  While most children later distanced themselves from his soft-spoken affect and constant reassurances of personal acceptance in adolescence, as adults many have come to appreciate his messages.  This will be especially true after watching the biographical documentary by Morgan Neville, Won’t You Be My Neighbor.

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Did You Know? Winter 2019

The Freeman/Lozier Library is always changing to keep up with the latest trends and services to offer you our best.  Our More Than Books newsletter has a “Did You Know” section that keeps you informed about the changes that have taken place in the library.  Here is the latest news from that newsletter:

 

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