Author Archives: Lorraine Patrick

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If you adore peanut butter, you will be happy to know that the entire month of November is dedicated to you! Peanut butter can be used in almost everything and is a common item in most food pantries nationwide. One little known fact is that peanuts are not nuts, but rather legumes which have nutritional components of healthy oils, fiber and protein. Continue reading

National Preparedness Month

 

September has been designated National Preparedness Month by the American Red Cross.  During this month, households across the country are encouraged to develop emergency plans in the event of a home fire or natural disaster (such as a flood, hurricane, earthquake, tornado, or thunderstorm).  Below are some tips to get you started on your Family Emergency Plan. Continue reading

National Simplify Your Life Week

As you know from the previous post, the first week of August is National Simplify Your Life Week.  Simple living is different for each person, but in general, a simplified life means that you are getting rid of clutter (both mental and physical) so that you can have more time and space for the things that you enjoy.  This is a week to think about what you enjoy in life as well as getting rid of the things you dislike.  Continue reading

Tips to Help You Stay Positive

Some days are great, most days are just good, and then we have those days that just wind up being bad.  On the bad days, what do you do?  Do you let them drag you down? We can change our approach to turning a bad day into a good day by using some of the tips below:

 

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Library Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management

Emergency situations can happen unexpectedly anytime and anywhere.  Although emergency situations at the Bellevue University Library are extremely rare, policies and procedures have been put in place should a disastrous event or emergency occurs.  According to the ALA (American Library Association), a library disaster is any incident “that threatens human safety and/or damages or threatens to damage a library’s collections, contents, facilities or services.”  Although the word “disaster” is a strong word, generally synonymous with “catastrophe,” it is important to note that an event does not have to be catastrophic in order for it to be disastrous in a library.

Proactive measures designed to handle medical emergencies and disruptions in service were created approximately 7 years ago.  Due to recent upgrades, as well as personnel changes, we decided to take a closer look at the Bellevue University Library’s Disaster Preparedness Manual and update it to reflect current practices.  The purpose of the Disaster Preparedness Manual is to be a resource should a medical emergency, disruption in service (such as a power outage or water main break) or emergency occur that would jeopardize the building’s structure, the library collection, or the safety of library staff and patrons (customers).

For example, in the event of a natural disaster, such as a tornado, the Library has two classrooms designated as tornado shelters for library staff and patrons.  If library materials are damaged due to water or mold or fire, steps have been put in place to salvage damaged library materials.  The Disaster Plan Manual also provides the names and phone numbers of local companies that specialize in recovering library materials.  Other topics covered in the manual include steps to repair insect damage, vandalism, and flood damage.

In addition to preserving library materials, the Library’s Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management Manual also includes the necessary steps needed in the case of other rare situations such as a gas leak, bomb threat, shelving unit collapse, suspicious package, active shooter, and medical emergency.

It is our hope that we will never need to use the manual, but we are also mindful that these situations could occur.  We have the peace of mind that current processes, procedures, and resources are readily available to keep the Library staff, patrons, and resources safe and secure.

Originally posted in the Freeman/Lozier Library’s quarterly newsletter, More Than BooksV. 21 No. 3, Summer 2018.

Cinco de Mayo

For many Americans, Cinco de Mayo means enjoying Mexican food and probably a few margaritas. But Cinco de Mayo, which means May 5th in Spanish, is probably one of the most misunderstood Mexican holidays.  Cinco de Mayo is not Mexico’s Independence Day, which is celebrated September 16th.  Rather, Cinco de Mayo is a day that commemorates the Mexican army’s unlikely victory over the French forces of Napoleon III on May 5, 1862 at the Battle of Puebla.

Today, Cinco de Mayo has become more of an American holiday than a Mexican one. It is seen as a day to celebrate Mexican pride, heritage and cultural achievements and experiences of people with a Mexican background.  In cities with a large Mexican population, it is a celebration that usually begins with a parade, along with businesses promoting Mexican food, drinks and music.

Nebraska’s south Omaha Latino community will host Cinco de Mayo events in Omaha May 4-6, 2018. Some of the highlights include mariachi bands, carnival rides, a Miss, Junior Miss and Little Miss Cinco de Mayo pageant, live music and a dazzling parade which begins on Saturday May 5th at 10:00am at the intersection of 24th & L Streets. For more information, please visit http://www.cincodemayoomaha.com/.

If you would like more information, the Bellevue University Library has some wonderful resources available below:

Cinco de Mayo Celebrates Freedom for All People by S. Weddington.

El Cinco de Mayo: An American Tradition.  By David E. Hayes-Bautista.

Why Cinco de Mayo makes a great American holiday. Daily Herald. 

Keep America Beautiful

For more than six decades, the non-profit organization Keep America Beautiful has served as a steward of litter prevention. Founded in 1953 in Stamford, CT, Keep America Beautiful has more than 600 community affiliates and engages more than 5 million volunteers.  The mission of Keep America Beautiful is to inspire and educate people to improve and beautify their community environments.  Continue reading