Author Archives: Chris Armstrong

National Stay Out of the Sun Day

July 3 is “Stay out of the Sun Day”.  National Stay out of the Sun Day is not a day for those who want a tan and love the sun beaming down on them. It is a day for those who want to stay out of the heat and the damage the sun does to our skin. It may have originated as a reminder to people of the link between skin cancer and the sun. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. And it doesn’t take a lifetime of sunburns and summers to occur. Skin cancer is the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults (ages 15-29).

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Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Everyone who has a brain is at risk to develop Alzheimer’s, which is the only leading cause of death that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. June is the month to wear purple and use your brain to help fight Alzheimer’s disease. Visit the Alzheimer’s Association website for the many events that are going on throughout the month.

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National Garden Month

In 2002, the National Gardening Association extended National Garden week for the entire month and celebrated for the first time in 2003. All gardens are celebrated, whether its’ an indoor, outdoor, patio garden or whatever it may be. If you are a gardener, then it’s time to sharpen your tools, collect your seeds, prepare your beds and plant. You don’t have to be a gardener to enjoy National Garden Month. You don’t have to plant but you can read about how to start a garden.  Test the waters by planting a few plants in pots and start a patio garden. It is the month to enjoy growing plants. Make sure you take time to look, smell and touch the plants that you are taking care of.  It is a time to be thankful for all of the plants, trees, herbs and shrubs that landscape our surroundings and learn about how plants affect our environment, our moods, and how we can heal from what we grow.

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Nebraska Statehood

Nebraska became the 37th state on March 1, 1867.  The capitol was originally in Omaha on the present site of Central High School, but was soon moved West, to Lancaster, later renamed Lincoln after the recently assassinated President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Nebraska means “flat water” and is an Otoe Indian term referring to the Platte River that flows through the state. The state motto is “Equality Before the Law”

 

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National Wear Red Day

In 2002, the first Friday of every February is National Wear Red Day and designated as American Heart Month by the American Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.  By wearing red you raise awareness about cardiovascular disease and save lives.  Since it has started, a third of women in the U.S. have lost weight and half of them are now more physically active.

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Amaryllis

Amaryllis means to sparkle in Greek.  Amaryllis bulbs are easy to grow.  They are easy to bloom again from year to year, unlike the Poinsettia. They produce large, colorful bell-shaped flowers that get better with time, the bulbs getting bigger and producing more flower stems. Properly cared for they can live for 75 years.  Amaryllis can be used as cut flowers. They last longer in a vase, up to two weeks.  If you get them as a Christmas gift, they usually come with a pot, soil and bulb and directions.  If you only have the bulb, plant each amaryllis bulb in a 6-8” pot. Heavy pots are preferred because the plant does become top heavy.  Lightweight pots may tip over under the weight of the bloom.  You may also need a support stake to keep the bloom upright. If you have a large bulb, you may get two or three flowering stalks that bloom over a period of several weeks.

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National Poinsettia Day

December 12 is National Poinsettia Day. It is named after the familiar holiday plant and marks the passing of Dr. Joel Poinsett, the first U.S. ambassador to Mexico, physician, an amateur botanist who died on December 12, 1851.  Poinsett introduced the Mexican flower to the United States in 1828. He sent cuttings back from the plant he discovered in Southern Mexico to his home in South Carolina.

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