National Etiquette Week

 

May I please have your attention?

How are you today?

These are just some common courtesy or etiquette questions to kick off National Etiquette Week.

It starts Monday, the 14th of May, and goes until the 18th. 

 

National Etiquette Week was founded by children’s etiquette consultant, Sandra Morisset, in 1997 to celebrate the value of good manners.  This week is a reminder to brush up on many of the manners we may have learned as children that have we have set aside and forgotten in our busy lives.  It is also a time to learn many more manners as we have evolved in technology with email, cell phones, and other gadgets.

Here are a few basic reminders:

  • Handshakes: Handshakes are often the first point of physical contact between you and a colleague or someone you’re meeting for the first time, and therefore they are of crucial importance. Remember to always offer your hand right away as a gesture of respect and acknowledgement. It is important to shake the other person’s hand firmly and to make full contact with their hand (no half handshakes, please!). Your handshake says a lot about you, so practice it with friends or colleagues.
  • Dining Table: Here are a few tips that we often forget but are important: Never begin eating your meal until the host has started eating theirs; that is your cue to begin. This may go without saying, but no elbows on the table! Not only is it rude, but it also gives the impression that you have bad posture. Perhaps most importantly, don’t ever chew with your mouth open, no matter how informal the meal. It is rude, lazy, and not very appetizing! Lastly, don’t forget to place your knife and fork in the proper finishing position: knife on the right, blade facing in, and fork on the left, in a 10 and 4 position.
  • Eye Contact: When you hold eye contact with someone who’s talking, you are actually showing him or her that you are listening and paying attention. It shows respect, awareness, and that you’re interested in what they have to say. The same is true the other way around; if you are speaking, hold eye contact with your audience, as it shows that you care about what you’re talking about, and it will help engage your audience so that they begin to care as well.

Here are some resources from our library to help you with your etiquette refresher course:

Mr. Manners: Lessons from Obama on Civility  BJ1853.P58 M7 2010

 

 

I See Rude People [electronic resource] : One Woman’s Battle to Beat Some Manners into Impolite Society E-Book BJ1533.C9 A45 2010  Online Access  
BELLEVUE: Access limited to Bellevue University patrons – click here to view

 

Etiquette and Modern Manners  BJ1873 .C97 2008

 

 

 

How to Be a Perfect Stranger : The Essential Religious Etiquette Handbook  BJ2010.H68 2002

 

 

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Etiquette [electronic resource]  E-Book BJ1853.M58 2000  Online Access   BELLEVUE: Access limited to Bellevue University patrons – click here to view
Bibliographic record display An electronic book accessible through the World Wide Web; click for information

 

Etiquette & Manners. 1 [electronic resource]  E-Book BJ1853 .C37 vol. 1  Online Access NetLibrary
BELLEVUE: Access limited to Bellevue University patrons – click here to view

Etiquette & Manners. 2 [electronic resource]  E-Book BJ1853 .C37 vol. 2  Online Access NetLibrary
BELLEVUE: Access limited to Bellevue University patrons – click here to view

 

 

An Uncommon History of Common Courtesy : How Manners Shaped the World  Credo E-Books Online

 

 

 

Etiquette Guide to China : Know the Rules that Make the Difference!  BJ2007.C56 D42 2016

 

 

 

Culture Shock! China : A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette DS779.23 .E24 2011

 

 

 

Resources:

http:www.margaretpage.com/mind-your-manners-its-national-etiquette-week/

https://www.corporateclassinc.com/blog/2015/12/in-honour-of-national-etiquette-week-back-to-the-basics/

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